Discourse on Integrating Emergency Care and Population Health

The Time Is Now to Use Clinical Outcomes as Quality Indicators for Effective Leadership in Trauma

Shahab Hajibandeh, MD, et al.

We read with interest the comprehensive review by Ford et al.,1 which was published in August 2016 issue of the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine. The authors aimed to review the best available evidence regarding the effect of leadership and teamwork in trauma and resuscitation on patient care and how effective leadership can be measured.

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Comments on “Low-Cost Alternative External Rotation Shoulder Brace and Review of Treatment in Acute Shoulder Dislocations”

Volume 16, Issue 3, May 2015
Robert W. Jordan, MBChB, MRCS, et al.

We read the paper of Lacy et al. (2015) with interest. The authors present a narrative review of the use of external rotation bracing in acute shoulder dislocations. One of the weaknesses of a narrative review is that it is more likely to be subject to reporting bias.

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Comments on “Low-Cost Alternative External Rotation Shoulder Brace and Review of Treatment in Acute Shoulder Dislocations”

Volume 16, Issue 3, May 2015
Kyle Lacy, MD, MS, et al.

Jordan et al. comment in their letter to the editor, “We feel that the narrative review in this publication does not provide a balanced overview of the clinical studies available and we question the value of external rotation in the management of these patients. They further state that, the paper is “likely to be subject to reporting bias.’’ Jordan et al. quote articles that question the value of external rotation bracing over internal rotation bracing for acute anterior dislocations.

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Discourse in Emergency Medicine and Population Health

Reply to Comments Regarding “Using Lean-Based Systems Engineering to Increase Capacity in the Emergency Department”

Volume 16, Issue 1, January 2015
Benjamin A. White, MD et al.

We very much appreciate the interest of our colleagues in this important topic, one that has yet to fully mature in the pantheon of emergency medicine literature. We also recognize and noted in our manuscript that the single-site nature of our work is a limitation. However, we disagree that this limitation makes scientific exploration and publication of this nature a fruitless endeavor as implied.

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Reply to Comments Regarding “Sensitivity of Emergency Bedside Ultrasound to Detect Hydronephrosis in Patients with Computed Tomography-proven Stones”

Volume 15, Issue 7, November 2014
Jeff Riddell, MD, et al.

In Reply:

We thank the authors of the letter for their insightful comments.
There were 98 patients with bedside US evidence of hydronephrosis and 11 patients with evidence of a stone. Only one patient with US evidence of stone had no hydronephrosis. The total number of patients with emergency department (ED) bedside US evidence of stone was 99. This correct number is consistent with Table 4.

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Comments on “Deliberate Apprenticeship in the Pediatric Emergency Department Improves Experience for Third-year Students”

Volume 15, Issue 7, November 2014
Kieran Walsh

Iyer et al. have presented an interesting study of the usefulness of a deliberate apprenticeship model in the pediatric emergency department for third year students.(1) The deliberate apprenticeship model appeared from both the quantitative and qualitative results to show benefits of deliberate apprenticeship.

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Reply to Comments Regarding “Deliberate Apprenticeship in the Pediatric Emergency Department Improves Experience for Third-Year Students”

Volume 15, Issue 7, November 2014
Maya S. Iyer, MD

The authors are appreciative of the interest in our study provided by the author(s) of this letter. We found the Deliberate Apprenticeship (DA) model to be useful for third year medical students rotating through our Pediatric Emergency Department in regards to performing more physical exams and also having greater comfort in obtaining histories and creating differential diagnoses.

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Discourse in Emergency Medicine and Population Health

Simulation for Professionals Who Care for Bariatric Patients: Some Unanswered Questions

Volume 15, Issue 4, July 2014
Kieran Walsh, FRCPI

Gable et al have presented an interesting study into the effectiveness of an educational intervention involving simulation and didactic teaching.(1) Certainly the problems with caring for obese patients are not going to go away quickly – so it is vital that we have adequate numbers of fully-trained staff that can care for them.

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Discourse in Emergency Medicine and Population Health

In Response to “Temperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Change”

Volume 14, Issue 5, September 2013
Matt N. Williams, MA, et al.

To the editor:

We were interested to read Gamble and Hess’s study finding that the daily incidence of violent crime in Dallas increased with temperatures up to 90°F (32.2°C), but decreased above this threshold. On this basis, their abstract surprisingly concludes that “higher ambient temperatures expected with climate change…. are not likely to be accompanied by markedly higher rates of violent crime” (p.239). This conclusion contrasts with the findings of previous studies.1–3

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Contact Information

WestJEM/ Department of Emergency Medicine
UC Irvine Health

333 The City Blvd. West, Rt 128-01
Suite 640
Orange, CA 92868, USA
Phone: 1-714-456-6389
Email: westjem@gmail.com

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WestJEM
ISSN: 1936-900X
e-ISSN: 1936-9018

CPC-EM
ISSN: 2474-252X

Our Philosophy

Emergency Medicine is a specialty which closely reflects societal challenges and consequences of public policy decisions. The emergency department specifically deals with social injustice, health and economic disparities, violence, substance abuse, and disaster preparedness and response. This journal focuses on how emergency care affects the health of the community and population, and conversely, how these societal challenges affect the composition of the patient population who seek care in the emergency department. The development of better systems to provide emergency care, including technology solutions, is critical to enhancing population health.