Disaster Medicine/Emergency Medical Services

Outcomes by Mode of Transport of ST Elevation MI Patients in the United Arab Emirates

Edward L. Callachan, et al.

The purpose of this multicenter study was to assess differences in demographics, medical history, treatment times, and follow-up status among patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), who were transported to the hospital by emergency medical services (EMS) or by private vehicle, or were transferred from other medical facilities.

Read More

Outcomes by Mode of Transport of ST Elevation MI Patients in the United Arab Emirates

Edward L. Callachan, MHealthSci, et al.

The purpose of this multicenter study was to assess differences in demographics, medical history, treatment times, and follow-up status among patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), who were transported to the hospital by emergency medical services (EMS) or by private vehicle, or were transferred from other medical facilities.

Read More

The San Bernardino, California, Terror Attack: Two Emergency Departments’ Response

Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2016.
Carol Lee, MD, et al.

On December 2, 2015, a terror attack in the city of San Bernardino, California killed 14 Americans
and injured 22 in the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001. Although emergency
personnel and law enforcement officials frequently deal with multi-casualty incidents (MCIs), what
occurred that day required an unprecedented response. Most of the severely injured victims were
transported to either Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) or Arrowhead Regional
Medical Center (ARMC). These two hospitals operate two designated trauma centers in the region
and played crucial roles during the massive response that followed this attack. In an effort to shed a
light on our response to others, we provide an account of how these two teaching hospitals prepared
for and coordinated the medical care of these victims.
In general, both centers were able to quickly mobilize large number of staff and resources. Prior
disaster drills proved to be invaluable. Both centers witnessed excellent teamwork and coordination
involving first responders, law enforcement, administration, and medical personnel from multiple
specialty services. Those of us working that day felt safe and protected. Although we did identify
areas we could have improved upon, including patchy communication and crowd-control, they were
minor in nature and did not affect patient care.
MCIs pose major challenges to emergency departments and trauma centers across the country.
Responding to such incidents requires an ever-evolving approach as no two incidents will present
exactly alike. It is our hope that this article will foster discussion and lead to improvements in
management of future MCIs.

Read More

Emergency Medical Services Public Health Implications and Interim Guidance for the Ebola Virus in the United States

Volume 16, Issue 1, January 2015
Christopher E. McCoy, MD, MPH et al.

The 25th known outbreak of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is now a global public health emergency and the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared the epidemic to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). Since the first cases of the West African epidemic were reported in March 2014, there has been an increase in infection rates of over 13,000% over a 6-month period.

Read More

Ebola Virus Disease: Essential Public Health Principles for Clinicians

Volume 15, Issue 7, November 2014
Kristi L. Koenig, MD et al.

Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) has become a public health emergency of international concern. The World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have developed guidance to educate and inform healthcare workers and travelers worldwide.

Read More

Utility of Vital Signs in Mass Casualty-Disaster Triage

Volume 15, Issue 7, November 2014
David E. Hogan, DO, MPH et al.

The triage of patients during a mass casualty – disaster (MCD) event presents the emergency healthcare provider with a complex and difficult issue. The task of evaluating casualties rapidly, using primarily the skills of physical examination, while still accurately identifying casualties likely to have critical injury or illness, may be impossible to achieve in practice.

Read More

Contact Information

WestJEM/ Department of Emergency Medicine
UC Irvine Health

333 The City Blvd. West, Rt 128-01
Suite 640
Orange, CA 92868, USA
Phone: 1-714-456-6389
Email: editor@westjem.org

Our Philosophy

Emergency Medicine is a specialty which closely reflects societal challenges and consequences of public policy decisions. The emergency department specifically deals with social injustice, health and economic disparities, violence, substance abuse, and disaster preparedness and response. This journal focuses on how emergency care affects the health of the community and population, and conversely, how these societal challenges affect the composition of the patient population who seek care in the emergency department. The development of better systems to provide emergency care, including technology solutions, is critical to enhancing population health.